Shopping Cart

Your shopping cart is empty.

Needlework crafts were extremely popular from the mid-to-late nineteenth century. Many needleworkers left Berlin work on canvas to experiment with the newly available and less expensive perforated paper and cardboard. This section presents examples of "craftsmanship" from the mid-to-late 19th century, including a childish adaptation of needlework structure.

Needlework horse portrait, about 1860 / Unidentified maker

Craftsmanship

Needlework horse portrait, about 1860 / Unidentified maker / United States / Wool, silk, linen, glass. Along with the growing popularity of animals as needlework subjects came different adaptive needlework techniques. Plushwork or raised embroidery could better interpret body contours. The maker often used glass eyes for a lifelike appearance. (Gift of Rolfe T. Teague)
Sampler, about 1865 / Amelia Kollock / Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Craftsmanship

Sampler, about 1865 / Amelia Kollock / Philadelphia, Pennsylvania / Silk and wool on perforated paper. At first glance, one might not realize this sampler is worked on perforated paper or Bristol board. This hobby, so popular from mid-19th century until the early 1900s, usually was confined to mottoes or quotations. The maker Amelia Kollock was born in 1852 and christened March 1853 at Wharton Street Methodist Episcopal Church, Philadelphia. She married Laban J. Pennewell in 1870. In the 1880 Maryland census, however, Laban is listed as head of household with a Mary E. Pennewell as his wife. (Friends of the Museum Purchase)
Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Memorial cross. (DAR Museum)

Craftsmanship

Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Memorial cross. (DAR Museum)
Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Hope. (DAR Museum)

Craftsmanship

Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Hope. (DAR Museum)
Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Roses and Hollyhocks. (DAR Museum)

Craftsmanship

Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Roses and Hollyhocks. (DAR Museum)
Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Rooster. (Gift of Sally A. McKean)

Craftsmanship

Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Rooster. (Gift of Sally A. McKean)
Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Liberty. (Gift of Mary Lane Davis)

Craftsmanship

Needlework cards, mid-to-late 19th century / Wool on perforated paper / Liberty. (Gift of Mary Lane Davis)
Sampler, 1887 / "Fanny" / Pennsylvania / Wool and cotton on canvas.

Craftsmanship

Sampler, 1887 / "Fanny" / Pennsylvania / Wool and cotton on canvas. Fanny was ten when she stitched this memento. Could it have been to satisfy her mother or grandmother? She included a brief acknowledgment of the alphabet and numerals, and gave her date, given name, and adds a cross. "Better bend/than break" is her common sense motto. All is properly compartmented. She clearly knew the basics. (Private collection)