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Current Museum Events

October 3, 2014
“Eye on Elegance: Early Quilts of Maryland and Virginia” Opens

EXHIBITION: Explore textile masterpieces made by women from Maryland and Virginia from 1790 to 1850. The women makers chose the finest imported fabrics of the time to show their status, taste, and refinement. Genealogical research has allowed us to know more about the artists and their assistants who created these fine works. Some women moved from the region and took their designs with them, but they still reflected their area of origins. This exhibition presents many quilt techniques: pieced, appliqué, reverse appliqué, and album.

“Eye on Elegance: Early Quilts of Maryland and Virginia” is free for all visitors and runs through September 5, 2015.

For tours of groups ten or larger, contact 202.879.3241.

 

October 18, 2014
Explore the Past: Textiles

FAMILY: Fall is a chilly time of year, so bundle up! Ever wonder where your clothes come from? Try your hand at making wool into yarn, explore a silkworm cocoon, and discover how people made clothing before there were factories. Drop-in, for all ages. This program is also part of the Neighbors to the President Consortium Fall Festival. Our free programs are made possible by the kindness of members of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Time: 1 pm - 4 pm

FREE

October 28, 2014
Tuesday Talk

SPEAKER: Alden O’Brien, Curator of Textiles and Costumes

ADULT/TEENS: Ms. O’Brien presents research leading to new findings about the many makers behind the quilts of “Eye on Elegance: Early Quilts of Maryland and Virginia.” Following the lecture, visit “Eye on Elegance” in the Museum’s Main Gallery. Our free programs are made possible by the kindness of members of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Time: 12 pm

FREE

November 18, 2014
Tuesday Talk

SPEAKER: Tyler Rudd Putnam, PhD student in History of American Civilization Program in the Department of History at the University of Delaware

ADULT/TEEN: Mr. Putnam presents the history and material culture of the British ship Augusta. The DAR Museum’s New Jersey Room has furniture and paneling made from wood of the Augusta. Our free programs are made possible by the kindness of members of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Time: 12 pm

FREE

December 2, 2014
Brew and Do

ADULT: Create your own tote bag with stamped designs. Learn about stamped and roller printing on late 18th and early 19th century fabric. Enjoy regional craft brews and sodas and Virginia music. Tour our new exhibition “Eye on Elegance: Early Quilts of Maryland and Virginia.” Must be 21 years of age with ID. Check website in mid-September for registration information.

Time: 5:30 - 8:00 pm

Cost: TBA

Current Exhibition

“Creating the Ideal Home, 1800-1939: Comfort and Convenience in America”

October 4, 2013 - August 30, 2014This exhibition explores how we got from the fireplace and washing clothes by hand to the many conveniences we take for granted today like automated electric appliances, plumbing and central heating. The comforts and conveniences that define modern life did not come about overnight but evolved during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Daily chores became easier especially for the housewife as American inventors patented all sorts of labor-saving devices from the vacuum to the washing machine. Technology also brought about ready entertainment and instant communication through the radio and telephone. Lighting advanced from the flickering candle to a bright, gas powered flame. Expectations forever changed with the introduction of electricity into homes beginning in the 1880s. Electrically powered devices like the light bulb and toaster defined the modern house by the roaring 1920s. The 1939 World’s Fair in New York City celebrated a “Century of Progress” with the debut of the television, a wonder that mesmerized visitors at the RCA building.

Over sixty objects dating from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries will be on exhibit showing the “latest” devices that no one could live without. In the final analysis, however, did these devices actually save time or did they create more work?