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Current Museum Events

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April 21, 2018
DAR Museum Historical Tea

12:00pm - 2:00pm

You asked, we listened! Introducing a spring date for our popular Historical Tea event:

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. Come prepared to celebrate women authors of the 19th century! From Jane Austen to Charlotte Perkins Gilman, women have contributed much to the literary canon. Join us for an afternoon tea with finger sandwiches and pastries. All are welcome!

This event will include an optional sharing by your fellow enthusiasts. If you wish to participate, you may come prepared with one or both of these options:

  1. Bring an excerpt from your favorite book by a 19th century female author to read aloud
  2. Come dressed as your favorite character or author and participate in a fashion show

Included in the ticket price:

  • Finger-sandwiches, croissants, & pastries
  • A tasting of teas popular in the mid-19th century
  • Special access to objects from the museum collection

Tickets $43

Please note: You will have the option of choosing the table at which you will sit. You may also select the individual seat at the table if you order through a desktop computer only; this feature is not supported on a mobile device.

 

May 4, 2018
Curated! A Symposium on Collecting

9:00am - 4:00pm

This symposium will explore the act of collecting in a decorative arts context, to compliment the museum’s upcoming exhibit, Lately Arrived: Recent Additions to the Collections.

Through this symposium, the museum hopes to foster professional and academic dialogue about the decorative arts, collecting, and why we do what we do. In particular we will be examining various aspects of collecting. What do we collect? Why? How do we determine what to save, and what to discard? Who decides what is valuable enough to save? What kinds of “value” do we place on objects?

This all-day symposium includes lunch and access to the DAR Museum's exhibits, including 31 period rooms.

Speakers:

"Early Patrons and Collectors of Hudson River School Landscape Painting" Alan Wallach, Wark Professor Emeritus, The College of William and Mary

"Rethinking Good, Better, Best: Alternative Approaches to Collecting" Alice W. Dickinson, Curator of Collections, New York Yacht Club; and Shoshana Resnikoff, Curator, Wolfsonian-FIU

"The Collector and the Cabinetmaker: Reproducing Antiques during the Colonial Revival" Erica Lome, PhD Candidate, University of Delaware

"Furnishing the Rockefeller Family Seat" Katrina London, Curatorial Assistant, Kykuit, the Rockefeller Estate

"Frontier Reality with a French Flair: Collecting Early Louisiana at Maison Chenal" Philippe Halbert, PhD Student, Yale University, History of Art

"George and Florence Blumenthal: A Collecting Partnership in the Gilded Age, 1858-1941" Rebecca Tilles, Associate Curator, Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens

"Northern Dealers, Southern Antiques: The Migration of Colonial Objects in the Early Twentieth Century" Trent Rhodes, Lois F. McNeil Fellow, Winterthur Program in American Material Culture

Tickets available starting March 1

May 8, 2018
Museum Tuesday Talk: What Fortune-Telling Can Tell Us

12:00-1:00

When was the last time you checked your horoscope? Have you ever had your palm read? You are not alone! People have been sneaking a peek into the future in this country since its beginning. The DAR Museum's collection includes two objects with occult connections: a teapot and a book. Find out about these objects and the people who used them: the questions they asked and the methods used to find the answers give us clues about the values of the time.

Speaker: Katie Cannon, Curator of Education, DAR Museum

May 19, 2018
My Family Story (Brownie)

10:30am – 12:00pm, DAR Museum

Use the DAR Museum collections to explore how family histories are collected and preserved. Share stories about your family with other Brownies and play a game to see how stories change over time. Then, write about your day in your personal diary and create a family tree to tell your family story! This program results in earning the "My Family Story" badge, which is included in the registration price.

Register at Eventbrite: https://myfamilystory-darmuseum-april21.eventbrite.com (Please note the change of date. Previously listed as April 21, 2018)

 
May 19, 2018
Playing the Past (Junior)

12:30pm – 2:30pm, DAR Museum

Travel back to 1913 to join the Women's Suffrage Parade! Create your own "Votes for Women" sash and write a speech advocating for a woman's right to vote. Learn about some of the heroines of the movement, including women that participated in the parade right here in DC. What would it be like to be a girl at this time? Why is it important that women have the right to vote? This program results in the "Playing the Past" badge, which is included in the registration price.

Register at Eventbrite: https://playingthepast-darmuseum-april21.eventbrite.com (Please note the change of date. Previously listed as April 21, 2018)

 
June 2, 2018
My Family Story (Brownie)

10:30am – 12:00pm, DAR Museum

Use the DAR Museum collections to explore how family histories are collected and preserved. Share stories about your family with other Brownies and play a game to see how stories change over time. Then, write about your day in your personal diary and create a family tree to tell your family story! This program results in earning the "My Family Story" badge, which is included in the registration price.

Register at Eventbrite:  https://myfamilystory-darmusem-june2.eventbrite.com

 
June 2, 2018
Playing the Past (Junior)

12:30pm – 2:30pm, DAR Museum

Travel back to 1913 to join the Women's Suffrage Parade! Create your own "Votes for Women" sash and write a speech advocating for a woman's right to vote. Learn about some of the heroines of the movement, including women that participated in the parade right here in DC. What would it be like to be a girl at this time? Why is it important that women have the right to vote? This program results in the "Playing the Past" badge, which is included in the registration price.

Register at Eventbrite: https://playingthepast-darmuseum-june2.eventbrite.com

 
June 12, 2018
Museum Lecture: How Vintage Clothing Became Mainstream

12:00-1:00pm

Free, drop-in

Tuesday Talk- “I’ma take your grandpa's style”– How Vintage Clothing Became Mainstream

Long before Macklemore rapped about popping tags at the thrift shop and wearing your grandpa’s clothes, vintage clothing was firmly established as a statement of individuality in the fashion world. The idea of wearing grandpa’s (and grandma’s) clothing as fashion and not for playing dress-up as children is a concept that dates back to about the 1950s. Over the decades, vintage clothing has transitioned from the counterculture/niche market to the pages of national fashion magazines, sold by major fashion labels, embraced by celebrities and of course, worn by Grammy-winning rap artists.

This presentation will trace the evolution of vintage from small boutiques to major retailers and online platforms and social media. It will also cover insider information on how the vintage market works, how to find good vintage deals, and how to care for your vintage items. 

Speaker: Deb Fuller, Learning Designer, Strayer University

July 10, 2018
Museum Lecture: “Preserving Life by Preserving Food: The Methods and Materials of America’s Food Keeping Traditions”

12:00-1:00

Tuesday Talk: “Preserving Life by Preserving Food: The Methods and Materials of America’s Food Keeping Traditions”

From ships galleys to royal patisseries, in slave cabins and kitchens of the “big house,” food sustained both human life and historical cultural traditions. In the days before refrigeration, preservation methods were just as important as the way food was grown or cooked. The culinary traditions of storing food for the future played a critical role in shaping the material culture of kitchens and storerooms across America. This presentation traces the developments in food preservation practices that were used to combat the inherent perishability of culinary fare. Taking a closer look at techniques like salting, smoking, pickling, and potting, this talk explores the objects and tools necessary to “put up” provisions and how preserved products influenced the creation of regional and national cuisines.

Speaker: Rachel Asbury, Lois F. McNeil Fellow, Winterthur Program in American Material Culture

August 4, 2018
World’s Fair

10:00am - 3:00pm

“You must see this fair.” – Hamlin Garland, 1893

Experience the excitement, innovation, and wonder of a c.1900 World’s Fair. Do you know what foods debuted at these fairs? Or what games children played? Learn about inventions that thrilled fairgoers and taste the snacks made popular by these grand events. Celebrate cultures around the world by exploring the booths of local embassies and cultural centers. Fun for children and adults alike, this event is not one to miss!

Girl Scout Brownies and Juniors have the option to earn a badge by attending this event! $10 fee for participating Scouts to cover the costs of the program materials and badge (which is included in the registration price). Registration links will be provided in the coming months. 

September 11, 2018
Museum Tuesday Talk: Suffragists in Washington DC: The 1913 Parade and the Fight for the Right to Vote

12:00-1:00

The Great Suffrage Parade was the first civil rights march to use the nation's capital as a backdrop. Despite sixty years of relentless campaigning by suffrage organizations, by 1913 only six states allowed women to vote. Then Alice Paul came to Washington, D.C. She planned a grand spectacle on Pennsylvania Avenue on the day before Woodrow Wilson's inauguration—marking the beginning of a more aggressive strategy on the part of the women's suffrage movement. Groups of women protested and picketed outside the White House, and some were thrown into jail. Newspapers across the nation covered their activities. These tactics finally led to the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. Author Rebecca Boggs Roberts narrates the heroic struggle of Alice Paul and the National Woman's Party as they worked to earn the vote.

Speaker: Rebecca Boggs Roberts, author of Suffragists in Washington, D.C.