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General (return to menu)
  1. What is DAR?
  2. Who can be a member of DAR?
  3. What is the difference between NSDAR and DAR?
  4. Why was famous black contralto, Marian Anderson, not permitted to sing at Constitution Hall in 1939?
  5. Does DAR accept members who are minorities?
  6. Is membership limited to certain religious affiliation?
  7. How do I become a member?
  8. Why does DAR have a lineal requirement for membership?
  9. Is DAR a political organization and does it lobby Congress?
  10. Do I have to be a member to qualify for DAR Scholarships?
  11. How do I get in touch with a local DAR chapter?
  12. Where can I get tickets for shows at Constitution Hall?

Q. What is DAR?
A. Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is a lineage society that is a non-profit, 501 (c) (3) charitable organization dedicated to historic preservation, education and patriotism. For more information about the DAR click here.

Q. Who can be a member of DAR?
A. Any woman 18 years or older, regardless of race, religion, or ethnic background, who can prove lineal descent from a patriot of the American Revolution, is eligible for membership. DAR defines a "patriot" as one who provided service or direct assistance in achieving America's independence. For more information about the DAR membership click here.

Q. What is the difference between NSDAR and DAR?
A. These acronyms both refer to the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, and are used interchangeably. The acronym is pronounced by saying each letter "D-A-R" rather than one word "Dar."

Q. Why was famous black contralto, Marian Anderson, not permitted to sing at Constitution Hall in 1939?
A. The incident in 1939 was one of the first milestones in the struggle for Civil Rights in America. Washington, D.C., was a segregated city at that time and Constitution Hall limited performances to white artists. As the country began to tear down the barriers of race-discrimination, DAR followed suit and changed its policy for the Hall. Miss Anderson sang at Constitution Hall six times after 1939 and launched her farewell tour from our stage.

For more information please visit Marian Anderson and the DAR.

Q. Does DAR accept members who are minorities?
A. Yes. DAR has members of all races and ethnic backgrounds. For more information about the DAR membership click here.

Q. Is membership limited to certain religious affiliation?
A. No. DAR is proud to have members from many different religions, including Catholic, Mormon, Jewish, Buddhist, and Islamic. For more information about the DAR membership click here.

Q. How do I become a member?
A. Get in touch with a local chapter by filling out a Prospective Member Information Request Form. For more information about becoming a member click here.

Q. Why does DAR have a lineal requirement for membership?
A. The DAR was founded in 1890 by four women whose common bond was the fact that each had fathers or grandfathers who were patriots of the American Revolution. The founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution sought to create an organization that would "perpetuate the memory and spirit of the women and men who achieved American independence."

Q. Is DAR a political organization and does it lobby Congress?
A. No, the DAR is not a political organization, nor does it lobby. DAR is a patriotic society composed of members who subscribe to different political philosophies.

Q. Do I have to be a member to qualify for DAR Scholarships?
A. No, the DAR provides many different types of scholarships which are open to all. See the Scholarships page of the National Society section for details.

Q. How do I get in touch with a local DAR chapter?
A. The best way to get in contact with a local chapter is to use the DAR Chapter Locator. If you are interested in joining the DAR, you may fill out the Membership Information Request Form, and a local member will contact you.

Q. Where can I get tickets for shows at Constitution Hall?
A. DAR does not produce the concerts performed at Constitution Hall. All tickets are sold through Ticketmaster or the promoter of the event. For more information about Constitution Hall click here.

Library (return to menu)
  1. During what hours is the DAR Library open?
  2. Is there a fee to use the DAR Library?
  3. Does the DAR Library have other research resources besides books?
  4. Does the DAR have my family's history on file?
  5. My great aunt was a member of the DAR. May I see her records?
  6. Is the Ancestor search feature of the online Genealogical Research System a complete listing of patriots from the Revolutionary War?
  7. Does DAR have a list of every person who fought in the Revolution?
  8. Are all of the books in the Library on the Revolutionary War period?
  9. Are any of the books in the DAR Library online?
  10. Can I borrow books from the DAR Library?

Q. During what hours is the DAR Library open?
A. The Library hours are Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 4:00 pm and Saturday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. The Library is closed on all Federal Holidays. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Is there a fee to use the DAR Library?
A. Yes, there is a daily user fee of $6.00 for individuals who are non-members of the DAR, Children of the American Revolution (CAR), Sons of the American Revolution (SAR), and Sons of the Revolution (SR). Members of the latter three groups must present a current membership card to receive the fee waiver. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Does the DAR Library have other research resources besides books?
A. Yes, the DAR Library has subscriptions to several electronic databases. They are the Ancestry Library Edition, HeritageQuest, Early American Newspapers, The New England Historic Genealogical Society, and Accessible Archives. The DAR Library does not provide remote access to any of these databases. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Does the DAR have my family's history on file?
A. Your family's history might be found in the DAR Library, which has over 25,000 compiled and published family histories available for research. In addition to published family histories, the library's collection includes county records and histories, Bible records, cemetery records, birth, marriage, and death records, military rosters, census records, and a variety of other published materials to assist researchers in compiling their own family histories. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. My great aunt was a member of the DAR. May I see her records?
A. In the interest of promoting genealogical research and to assist prospective applicants, NSDAR allows access to its archived member applications. These records can be viewed at the Seimes Microfilm Center of the DAR Library and copies may be obtained with electronic ordering through our website and $15.00 by mail. It should be noted that access to DAR records is limited for private research usage only. Records may not be requested for re-publication or public exposure. In addition to the application, the accompanying "proof documents" used to prove the link between each generation in the lineage and to prove the type of patriotic service for the application process are also be available for viewing on site in the Library’s Seimes Technology Center. These documents are arranged by the name of the patriot not the member. Please note, the DAR Library does not have a "proof document" file for every patriot. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Is the Ancestor search feature of the online Genealogical Research System a complete listing of patriots from the Revolutionary War?
A. No, it is a composite of only those patriots whose descendants have joined the DAR. For Example, George Washington had no children, will not be found in the DAR Patriot Index, but Martha Washington, who had children prior to her marriage to George, is included in the Index The earlier printed version of the DAR Patriot Index have been superseded by the GRS databases, which are kept up-to-date on a daily basis. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Does DAR have a list of every person who fought in the Revolution?
A. No, because record keeping varied from state to state, there is no complete list of every soldier/sailor who served during the American Revolutionary War. The DAR Library does have lists of soldiers/sailors/etc. from the original colonies and other subsequent states, however these lists vary widely in the type of information recorded for each soldier. Some include birth, death, marriage dates, place of residence, and a lengthy description of service. Others are simply lists of names. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Are all of the books in the library on the Revolutionary War period?
A. No, while books on the Revolution are obviously important to the Library, they constitute only a part of the approximately 220,000 books in the collection. The focus of the Library is American history and genealogy. Towards those ends, the Library collects books that will help patrons trace their lineage. Consequently, visitors to the Library will find books of cemetery records, tax records, probate records, marriages, and births. The DAR Library's collection covers all four centuries of American history. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Are any of the books in the DAR Library online?
A. None of the Library's books, files, or manuscripts are available online. However, the Library's online catalog can be viewed in the Library section. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Q. Can I borrow books from the DAR Library?
A. No, the DAR Library collection does not circulate, and the Library does not have an interlibrary loan program. Patrons who cannot travel to Washington, D.C., may wish to search the Library's online catalog and take advantage of the Library's Search Service for photocopy requests. For more information about the DAR Library click here.

Museum (return to menu)
  1. During what hours is the DAR Museum open?
  2. What's the closest Metro station to the DAR Museum?
  3. Do I need to arrange for a special tour of the museum?
  4. Is there a way for me to experience the DAR Museum without visiting Washington, D.C.?
  5. What types of programs does the DAR Museum provide for children?
  6. Can the DAR Museum staff identify my antique object?
  7. Can the Museum staff tell me how to care for my antiques?
  8. Does the DAR Museum give appraisals?
  9. I'd like to donate something to the museum. How do I do that?
  10. What kinds of things do you sell in the DAR Museum Shop?

Q. During what hours is the DAR Museum open?
A. Museum hours are Monday - Friday 9:30 am - 4:00 pm, Saturday, 9:00 am - 5:00 pm. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. What's the closest Metro station to the DAR Museum?
A. Farragut North (Red Line) or Farragut West (Orange and Blue Lines). For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. Do I need to arrange for a special tour of the museum?
A. No, the museum gallery is self-guided and open during museum hours. Docent-led tours of the period rooms are available for walk-in visitors on the hour and the half hour, Monday through Friday from 10:00 am to 2:30 pm, and Saturday from 9:00 am to 4:30 pm, subject to docent availability. Self-guided Period Rooms tours are available during museum hours. Admission is free. Special arrangements should be made for groups of 10 or larger at least 4 weeks in advance by calling (202) 879-3241. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. Is there a way for me to experience the DAR Museum without visiting Washington, D.C.?
A. Yes, you can take a Virtual Tour of the museum period rooms. You can also view Virtual Exhibitions and Featured Museum Objects online. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. What types of programs does the DAR Museum provide for children?
A. The DAR Museum provides several different types of hands-on learning programs for children such as family craft programs, summer camps, and a touch area. Please see the Educational Programs page of the Museum section for more information or call (202) 879-3240. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. Can the DAR Museum staff identify my antique object?
A. Possibly. The museum staff encompasses a broad range of expertise in early American decorative arts, including furniture, silver, ceramics, glass, and a variety of textiles. Send us a photograph of your item, or call 202-879-3241 or email museum@dar.org for curatorial advice. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. Can the DAR Museum staff tell me how to care for my antiques?
A. Possibly. We can give you general information, and refer you to sources for conservation or supplies. The American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works is a good place to start. They have a page on their web site devoted to "Caring for Your Treasures." For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. Does the DAR Museum give appraisals?
A. No, the museum staff does not provide appraisals. Please contact the American Society of Appraisers at (703) 478-2228, www.appraisers.org, or the International Society of Appraisers at (206) 241-0359, www.isa-appraisers.org, for the name of an appraiser near you. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. I'd like to donate something to the museum. How do I do that?
A. First, check our "wish list" available on this web site to get an idea of what sort of items we collect. Then contact the museum either via email, telephone, or by letter. Keep in mind that we must consider many things in accepting a gift of an object such as condition, rarity (we may already have several things like it already), family history, as well as our ability to care for the item properly. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Q. What kinds of things do you sell in the DAR Museum Shop?
A. The DAR Museum Shop sells gift items and books that relate to the mission of the museum. There is a great selection of toys, ceramics, scented items, jewelry, silver, quilt and needlework items, and so much more. Please call (202) 879-3208 or email museumshop@dar.org. The Museum Shop is open the same hours as the museum. Shipping is available for orders placed by phone, mail, email or the website. For more information about the DAR Museum click here.

Scholarships (return to menu)
  1. What types of scholarships does DAR provide?
  2. How do I get an application for a DAR scholarship?
  3. Do you have scholarships for American Indian students?
  4. Can DAR help prove my American Indian heritage?
  5. Does the DAR Scholarship program provide financial assistance for travel or participation in summer camps?

Q. What types of scholarships does DAR provide?
A. The DAR provides a variety of scholarships to high school and college students. To find out more about specific scholarships given by DAR, please visit the Scholarships page.

Q. How do I get an application for a DAR scholarship?
A. To obtain an application, Please visit the Scholarships page and click on The DAR Scholarship Application Form. For more information about DAR scholarships click here.

Q. Do you have scholarships for American Indian students?
A. Yes, in addition to a wide variety of other scholarships, DAR has specific scholarships to help American Indian students pay for their college education or vocational training. For more information on American Indian scholarships, please visit the Scholarships page.

Q. Can DAR help prove my American Indian heritage?
A. No, however if you need assistance in proving your Indian bloodline, please see http://www.native-languages.org
/genealogy.htm
. If you search the web you will find other similar sites. For more information about DAR scholarships click here.

Q. Does the DAR Scholarship program provide financial assistance for travel or participation in summer camps?
A. DAR scholarships are offered to help defray the costs of tuition, books, and room and board for specific courses of study at the college and graduate levels. Unfortunately, the scholarship program does not provide funding to assist students defray the costs of travel or participation in summer programs or camps. For more information about DAR scholarships click here.

Constitution Hall (return to menu)
  1. Why doesn't DAR Constitution Hall have its schedule in the weekend section of The Washington Post?
  2. Why can't I buy tickets for every event at DAR Constitution Hall at the box office?
  3. Does Constitution Hall have on-site parking?
  4. Is there food available at Constitution Hall?
  5. Is Constitution Hall a government building?

Q. Why doesn't DAR Constitution Hall have its schedule in the weekend section of The Washington Post?
A. DAR Constitution Hall does not produce any of the events presented in the Hall. All events are arranged by independent producers or sponsors who are responsible for all the details of the presentation. The producer is solely responsible for ticket sales, advertising, hiring and paying all necessary staff, contracting vendors, and paying the acts. You can locate the event schedule in the Constitution Hall section. For more information about Constitution Hall click here.

Q. Why can't I buy tickets for every event at DAR Constitution Hall at the box office?
A. The DAR Constitution Hall box office is only open on the day of an event, for only that event, and is operated by the producer of the event, not the Constitution Hall staff. For more information about Constitution Hall click here.

Q. Does Constitution Hall have on-site parking?
A. There is adequate metered parking on the streets surrounding the Hall at night and on weekends but there is no parking for Hall events on the DAR grounds. The nearest Metro station is Farragut North, which is 6 blocks north of the Hall or Farragut West. The Colonial Parking Garage near Constitution Hall stays open for public events at the Hall. For more information about Constitution Hall click here.

Q. Is there food available at Constitution Hall?
A. There is light fare available in the lobby of Constitution Hall during most shows. You can find a list of nearby restaurants on the Visitor Services page of the Constitution Hall section. Also, there is full bar service available in the lobby as well as in the lounge on the lower level. For more information about Constitution Hall click here.

Q. Is Constitution Hall a government building?
A. No, DAR Constitution Hall is part of a three-building complex owned and operated by the Daughters of the American Revolution. The Hall was originally built in 1929 to house the DAR annual convention and now serves as a privately-owned performance venue. For more information about Constitution Hall click here.

Membership (return to menu)
  1. My brother is a SAR, can I use his application?
  2. I'm adopted can I still become a member?
  3. My patriot is listed in your library; do I still need to complete an application?

Q. My brother is a SAR, can I use his application?
A. No, DAR does not utilize applications of other hereditary societies. DAR requires the use of its specific application and submission of proof documentation which is entered into the DAR Library's collection of genealogical histories. For more information about DAR membership click here.

Q. I'm adopted can I still become a member?
A. Yes, but only through your birth parents' lineage, not that of your adopted family. All lineage for DAR membership must be bloodline descent. For more information about DAR membership click here.

Q. My patriot is listed in your library; do I still need to complete an application?
A. Yes, each member is required to complete an application which is included in the genealogical files. For more information about DAR membership click here.

Historian General (return to menu)
  1. What is the DAR Americana Collection?
  2. My family has some old DAR-related records that were in the possession of one of my relatives, now deceased. What should I do with these records?
  3. What is the DAR History Award Medal?
  4. How can I find out if my Revolutionary War era ancestor's grave has had a DAR marker placed at his/her gravesite?
  5. My deceased relative was a member of the DAR, and she wished to have a DAR Insignia marker placed at her gravesite. How do I go about obtaining a DAR Insignia marker for my relative?
  6. How can I find out how to properly care for our DAR chapter or state society records?
  7. How can I find out about conducting research in the NSDAR Archives?

Q. What is the DAR Americana Collection?
A. The Americana Collection is a collection of more than 4,000 early American manuscripts and rare imprint materials (such as books, almanacs, broadsides, newspapers, paper currency). The DAR Americana Collection is housed in the DAR National Headquarters and is open to the public, Monday-Friday, 8:30 am - 4:00 pm. Potential donations of historical documents must be pre-approved by the Office of the Historian General. Please do not submit materials for the collection without first speaking to a NSDAR archivist. If you wish to conduct research in the collection, please contact a NSDAR archivist by email (historian@dar.org) and be as specific as possible about both the nature of your research and the materials you wish to access. For more information click here.

Q. My family has some old DAR-related records that were in the possession of one of my relatives, now deceased. What should I do with these records?
A. Please contact the NSDAR archival staff by email (historian@dar.org), by phone (202-879-3256), or by regular mail (Office of the Historian General, NSDAR, 1776 D Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006), providing a detailed description of the DAR-related materials in your possession. Once apprised of the nature of this material, the archival staff will determine whether you should talk to a DAR chapter regent, a state DAR organization official, or the NSDAR archival staff member, concerning the transfer of these DAR records back into DAR custody. Appropriate contact information will then be provided. For more information click here.

Q. What is the DAR History Award Medal?
A. Any individual or group whose study and/or promotion of some aspect of American history-on the regional or national level-has significantly advanced the understanding of America’s past is eligible for this award. These contributions to the study of American history may have been associated with (but are not limited to) archives, manuscript collections, historical societies, libraries, museums or other organizations. Writers and/or editors of significant historical publications, historical researchers and persons involved with preservation efforts of historical buildings, artifacts or records are eligible for this award. Work performed in history-related disciplines such as genealogy, museum studies, anthropology, archaeology, political science, etc may be eligible; however, the primary goal and the final result of the project must have been the study and/or promotion of some aspect of American history. DAR members are eligible for this award; however, they must meet the same requirements as non-DAR candidates. Each nomination is judged only on the accomplishments of the nominee in relation to the submission requirements outlined on the reverse of this instruction sheet. Nominations are not compared with other nominations.

Q. How can I find out if my Revolutionary War era ancestor's grave has had a DAR marker placed at his/her gravesite?
A. The Office of the Historian General maintains a catalog of the graves of Revolutionary War soldiers and patriots that have been marked by the DAR. To request information on the marking of an ancestor's grave please call (202-879-3256) or email (historian@dar.org) the staff of the Historian General's office. For more information click here.

Q. My deceased relative was a member of the DAR, and she wished to have a DAR Insignia marker placed at her gravesite. How do I go about obtaining a DAR Insignia marker for my relative?
A. Please contact the Office of the Historian General by telephone (202-879-3256) or by e-mail (historian@dar.org) and let us know of your situation. We will send you the necessary forms. We will also put you in contact with the regent of your deceased relative's DAR chapter, who will need to sign the permission form. Once you have a signed permission form in hand, that form can be sent to one of the firms authorized to reproduce the DAR Insignia, from which you will then be allowed to purchase the marker. For more information click here.

Q. How can I find out how to properly care for our DAR chapter or state society records?
A. The Chapter or State Regent is responsible for the disposition of chapter or state records including records obtained as a result of two or more chapters merging into one chapter. All decisions regarding retention, storage and use of records are the responsibility of the Regent. Records from disbanded chapters should be deposited with the state society. If you have questions regarding which records should be retained, or how to properly store or preserve them, please contact a NSDAR archivist by email (historian@dar.org), by phone (202-879-3256), or by regular mail (Office of the Historian General, NSDAR, 1776 D Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006). For more information click here.

Q. How can I find out about conducting research in the NSDAR Archives?
A. The purpose of the NSDAR Archives is to serve as the repository for NSDAR records which are no longer administratively useful but which have sufficient historical or other value to warrant their continued preservation. The NSDAR Archives houses the non-current permanent records created in the course of business by the National Society—items such as correspondence, meeting minutes, project files, photographs and the like. Although some items are available for research use without permission, access to much of the collection requires the permission of the President General. For more information click here.

Events (return to menu)
  1. Do you have to be a DAR member to host an event at DAR National Headquarters building?
  2. How many people can a DAR-hosted event accommodate?
  3. What types of private events can be held at the DAR building?

Q. Do you have to be a DAR member to host an event at DAR National Headquarters building?
A. No. Rental of DAR building space is open to anyone. For more information on hosting an event at the DAR, go to the Entertaining at DAR page in the National Society section.

Q. How many people can a DAR-hosted event accommodate?
A. There are a number of different rooms that are available for rent at DAR Headquarters and can host a variety of different types of functions. There are smaller, more intimate rooms that have been host to parties as small as 10 people. There are also large, adjoining rooms that can accommodate up to 700 people. For more information on specific room rentals and capacities, see the Entertaining at DAR page in the National Society section.

Q. What types of private events can be held at the DAR building?
A. The DAR building hosts a variety of different private events including weddings, receptions, Bar/Bat Mitzvahs, meetings, corporate events, and filmings. For more information see the Entertaining at DAR webpage.

Employment (return to menu)
  1. Do I have to be a member to work at DAR?
  2. How do I find out about available job or internship openings at NSDAR?
  3. How do I apply for a job in Constitution Hall for concerts and other events such as usher, security, or selling concessions?

Q. Do I have to be a member to work at DAR?
A. No. The DAR is an equal-opportunity employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, gender, national origin, age disability, religion, sexual orientation, marital status, or any other grounds prohibited by federal or District of Columbia law
Job vacancies are open to anyone who wishes to apply.

Q. How do I find out about available job or internship openings at NSDAR?
A. You can obtain information about current job and internship opportunities from the Employment page of the National Society section.

Q. How do I apply for a job in Constitution Hall for concerts and other events such as usher, security, or selling concessions?
A. All Constitution Hall event-related positions are coordinated through the company in charge of that service and not DAR. For ushering positions contact: Theater Services Inc., (202) 333-4088. For security positions contact: Falcon Security, (202) 251-8080. For concessions positions contact: Best Vending Inc., (202) 737-4443. For stage crew positions contact: Local 22 of I.A.T.S.E., (301) 593-4650.

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